Dion Haynes

Biography

Dion Haynes has recently been hired as the K-12 public education writer for The Washington Post. Haynes worked as a staff writer at the Chicago Tribune for 13 years until January 2004 when he left to pursue his longtime dream of publishing his novel.

In his most recent position at the Tribune, Haynes was a national correspondent based in the Los Angeles bureau. From 1996 to 2004, he covered numerous major stories throughout the West, including the Freemen standoff in Montana; the O.J. Simpson civil trial in Santa Monica, Calif.; the Columbine High School massacre in Colorado; the Terry Nichols Oklahoma City bombing trial in Denver; the Columbia space shuttle disaster in Houston; and the often wacky California gubernatorial recall election. Besides covering breaking news, Haynes wrote extensively on education, the environment, race relations, public policy and the entertainment industry. A highlight of his tenure was interviewing the singing group En Vogue, Tobey “Spiderman” Maguire, Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan. Besides the main news section, his stories appeared in Tempo, Arts & Entertainment, Business, Sports and WomanNews.

Prior to his assignment in Los Angeles, Haynes was a Metro reporter, covering the Chicago Public Schools. He wrote investigative stories examining corruption, news stories scrutinizing bureaucratic blunders and feature stories illuminating innovative programs. While on the Metro desk, Haynes was among a team of reporters who worked on a year-long series called “Saving Our Children,” which not only detailed the societal problems that led to a high child homicide rate, but explored solutions. The series won numerous awards and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist.

Haynes started his newspaper career at the Providence Journal in Rhode Island, where he worked as a staff writer from 1986 to 1990.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in electronic journalism from Wayne State University in Detroit and a master’s degree from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.